chamisul:

tismys:

gxxdgxxn:

A$AP Rocky & Chanel Iman for Vogue September 2014

They look so good 

oh my god

(via unsuccessfulmetalbenders)

stoleyogirl:

when you see ur squad while you out with your parentsimage

(via roojieq)

rkrispyt:

xghoststreak:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

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I thought watermelon just had too much rind and that was wrong until I saw the next gif 

My friend is in this and I had no idea until I saw someone post it on social media. 

(via roojieq)

(Source: kingjaffejoffer, via sbrown82)

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. (via bakcwadrs)

a couple of other quotes from the article i really like:

According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace

and

Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life! Before succumbing to the intoxicating warmth of that promise, it’s critical to ask, “Who, exactly, benefits from making work feel like nonwork?” “Why should workers feel as if they aren’t working when they are?” In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, DWYL is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time.

(via mercy-misrule)

(via daeneryssedai)

iknowwhythesongbirdsings:

narryeverlasting:

Exactly.


Truth.

Moreover, it is offensive to me that I cannot grieve for Robin Williams’ death AND Michael Brown’s death, all because I’m black. That my rage and anger and sadness over the senseless gunning down of a young black man cannot coexist with my sadness and anger that the depression stole the life of yet another great individual, all because I’m black. I like Thai food and fried chicken. I love Lawrence Brownlee and Sam Cooke, Leontyne Price and Aretha Franklin, Maria Callas and Bonnie Raitt, Beethoven and Ellington with equal measure. I’m intelligent enough to hold all these things in my brain and heart AND still be black.

iknowwhythesongbirdsings:

narryeverlasting:

Exactly.

Truth.

Moreover, it is offensive to me that I cannot grieve for Robin Williams’ death AND Michael Brown’s death, all because I’m black. That my rage and anger and sadness over the senseless gunning down of a young black man cannot coexist with my sadness and anger that the depression stole the life of yet another great individual, all because I’m black. I like Thai food and fried chicken. I love Lawrence Brownlee and Sam Cooke, Leontyne Price and Aretha Franklin, Maria Callas and Bonnie Raitt, Beethoven and Ellington with equal measure. I’m intelligent enough to hold all these things in my brain and heart AND still be black.

(via lazyexceptwhencooking)

diversityinya:

This week’s diverse new releases:

The Girl from the Well by Rin Chupeco (Sourcebooks Fire)

“Chupeco makes a powerful debut with this unsettling ghost story, drawing from the same ancient Japanese legend that inspired The Ring and other horror pieces. Okiku is a vengeful spirit who wanders the world. … Told in a marvelously disjointed fashion from Okiku’s numbers-obsessed point of view, this story unfolds with creepy imagery and an intimate appreciation for Japanese horror, myth, and legend.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Blind by Rachel DeWoskin (Viking)

“With traces of John Green’s Looking for Alaska (2005), DeWoskin’s first teen novel explores death and darkness. Blinded in a fireworks accident, Emma Silver has finally learned to find “shorelines” with her white cane and identify her six wildly different siblings by their breathing. Her rehabilitation is meticulously described, from learning to decipher braille to containing her panic. … A vivid, sensory tour of the shifting landscapes of blindness and teen relationships.” — Kirkus, starred review

Of Metal and Wishes by Sarah Fine (Margaret K. McElderry Books)

“In contrast to dystopian novels with world-shaking stakes, Fine (the Guards of the Shadowlands series) focuses on a detailed microcosm within an unjust society. She centers her tale of forbidden love and social awakening on a single industrial complex, where brutal bosses control workers by keeping them permanently in debt. … Fine creates a memorable atmosphere of desperation, deftly weaving together numerous subplots that intersect in a grisly and satisfying climax.” — Publishers Weekly

I Love I Hate I Miss My Sister by Amélie Sarn (Delacorte)

“In short anguished chapters, 18-year-old Sohane narrates scenes from the weeks before and months after the brutal murder of her younger sister, Djelila. Raised in an Algerian Muslim family living in Paris, the two girls seek to establish their identity in different ways. … French author Sarn includes a glossary of Arabic words and terms related to Islam, as well as a note about the real-life event that inspired this moving story, which provides rich material for conversation about family relations, religious identity, and civil liberties.” — Publishers Weekly

yagazieemezi:

Know Safa Idriss Nour (then & now)

Super model Waris Dirie Somali model insisted Safa Idriss Nour, the child who played her suffering FGM in biopic, had to be spared the same fate

When she was three years old, Safa Idriss Nour received something no girl in her slum in Djibouti had been given before – a signed contract from her parents stating they would never inflict genital mutilation on her.

In Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, an estimated 98% of girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM), a procedure that usually involves cutting off the clitoris and some of the labia, so this was a remarkable event. Equally remarkable is the story of how Nour came to get the contract and, indeed, of her battle to ensure that her parents stuck to the terms of the deal.

Nour starred in a film adaptation of Desert Flower, the international bestselling autobiography by Somali model and anti-FGM activist Waris Dirie. Published in 1997, her first book follows Dirie from her birth into a nomadic family in Somalia – from whom she fled, aged 13, after her father attempted to marry her to a 60-year-old man – to her becoming an international supermodel.

In 2007, Nour was asked to play the young Dirie as she undergoes FGM – on condition that her parents sign a contract agreeing never to perform the same ritualistic operation on her (keep reading)

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

controlledeuphoria:

jellygod:

PETITION LINK HERE

Please help bring justice to Islan Nettles and transgender people living in NYC. Let the NYPD know that transgender people do matter. Please reblog this post and sign the petition, we do not have much time left.

If y’all real y’all will reblog this too

(via thewindbeneathyourweave)

draqua:

Talk shit, get hit…

(via thewindbeneathyourweave)

bellecosby:

Guyyyyss

If you want to see movies on Netflix that aren’t available in America

On chrome you can download the hola extension and then change settings to UK and it gives you more movie options

(via thewindbeneathyourweave)